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Interdisciplinary Approaches to Deal with Alzheimer’s Disease—From Bench to Bedside: What Feasible Options Do Already Exist Today?

Affiliation
Speech and Language Therapy, Campus Bonn, SRH University of Applied Health Sciences, 53111 Bonn, Germany
Ablinger, Irene;
Affiliation
Speech and Language Therapy, Campus Düsseldorf, SRH University of Applied Health Sciences, 40210 Düsseldorf, Germany
Dressel, Katharina;
Affiliation
Interdisciplinary Periodontology and Prevention, Campus Rheinland, SRH University of Applied Health Sciences, 51377 Leverkusen, Germany
Rott, Thea;
ORCID
0000-0002-8327-452X
Affiliation
Nutrition Therapy and Counseling, Campus Rheinland, SRH University of Applied Health Sciences, 51377 Leverkusen, Germany
Lauer, Anna Andrea;
Affiliation
Sport Science, Campus Rheinland, SRH University of Applied Health Sciences, 51377 Leverkusen, Germany
Tiemann, Michael;
ORCID
0000-0003-3004-4461
Affiliation
Sport Science and Physiotherapy, Campus Rheinland, SRH University of Applied Health Sciences, 51377 Leverkusen, Germany
Batista, João Pedro;
Affiliation
Physiotherapy, Campus Rheinland, SRH University of Applied Health Sciences, 51377 Leverkusen, Germany
Taddey, Tim;
Affiliation
Nutrition Therapy and Counseling, Campus Rheinland, SRH University of Applied Health Sciences, 51377 Leverkusen, Germany
Grimm, Heike Sabine;
Affiliation
Nutrition Therapy and Counseling, Campus Rheinland, SRH University of Applied Health Sciences, 51377 Leverkusen, Germany
Grimm, Marcus Otto Walter

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases in the western population. The incidence of this disease increases with age. Rising life expectancy and the resulting increase in the ratio of elderly in the population are likely to exacerbate socioeconomic problems. Alzheimer’s disease is a multifactorial disease. In addition to amyloidogenic processing leading to plaques, and tau pathology, but also other molecular causes such as oxidative stress or inflammation play a crucial role. We summarize the molecular mechanisms leading to Alzheimer’s disease and which potential interventions are known to interfere with these mechanisms, focusing on nutritional approaches and physical activity but also the beneficial effects of cognition-oriented treatments with a focus on language and communication. Interestingly, recent findings also suggest a causal link between oral conditions, such as periodontitis or edentulism, and Alzheimer’s disease, raising the question of whether dental intervention in Alzheimer’s patients can be beneficial as well. Unfortunately, all previous single-domain interventions have been shown to have limited benefit to patients. However, the latest studies indicate that combining these efforts into multidomain approaches may have increased preventive or therapeutic potential. Therefore, as another emphasis in this review, we provide an overview of current literature dealing with studies combining the above-mentioned approaches and discuss potential advantages compared to monotherapies. Considering current literature and intervention options, we also propose a multidomain interdisciplinary approach for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease patients that synergistically links the individual approaches. In conclusion, this review highlights the need to combine different approaches in an interdisciplinary manner, to address the future challenges of Alzheimer’s disease.

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